Singin’ in the Rain: Timeless Influence!

This post is for the Singin’ in the Rain Blogathon hosted by The Classic Movie Muse! Be sure to check out the other entries!!

Singin’ in the Rain was technically not a new concept when it was first released in 1952. It’s a movie about the movies, and a backstage musical, both of which were done before. Yet, the manner in which the story plays out, as well as the visual choreography was ground breaking and its formula has been used ever since.

Perhaps the best known influence on Singin’ in the Rain was on another MGM musical made just a year later: The Band Wagon.  Like Singin’, The Band Wagon is both a backstage and  jukebox musical. Plus, it even has Cyd Charisse! Wagon’s leading man is the other famous dancer Fred Astaire and instead of a movie, the plot centers around a stage show. A main parallel this movie has with its predecessor is perhaps the sequence of final dance numbers with the “Girl Hunt” being similar in tone and style to the “Gotta Dance” number.

Cyd Charisse: A dangerous dame of a dancing partner in both movies!

If you’re from my generation and grew up with the High School Musical (2006-2008) movies, Singin’ in the Rain served as major inspiration for director-choreographer Kenny Ortega and choreographer Charles Kaplow. In the first movie, the Getcha’ Head in the Game performance visually and stylistically pays tribute to Gene’s style of dancing. In addition, the use of basketballs as props is very Gene Kelly-esque, as Gene was famous for integrating props into his dances.

Troy and the Wildcats
Don and his Rain Gang!

In 2012, Rock of Ages was adapted for the big screen, being a jukebox musical. It used some of the most well known rock songs from the 1980s as its soundtrack. Some of my favorite songs used in the flick, like “Pour some Sugar on Me”, “Every Rose has its Thorn”, and “Wanted Dead or Alive'”. I honestly can admit, while I don’t exactly love this movie, it has a seriously perfect 80’s vibe to it, and it’s fun to catch on TV every now and again.

The latest movie to utilize the influence is Downton Abbey: A New Era (2022). Without giving too much away, part of the plot involves a silent movie being filmed at Downton. The starring actress in the fictional movie, The Gambler, Myrna Dalgleish (Laura Haddock), is a silent screen queen- but much like Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen) is beyond all help when the movie must be turned into a talkie.  I thought it was super amusing Downton honored Singin‘ because both of these entities as so iconic, and to have them tied together by this plot point certainly a chef’s kiss!

Miss Lina Lamont: Struggles with the Sound!
Miss Myrna Dagleish: Silent Star

As time rolls on, I have no doubt that actors, directors, dancers, choreographers and entertainers will be be looking to Singin’ in the Rain for inspiration and influence. When something is so well loved and timeless, it’s going to be referred to. The minuscule list I compiled is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the amount of times the movie has been seen and felt in other works, I can’t wait to see what will pop up in the future!

Day 1 of The 5th William Holden Golden Boy Blogathon

Day 1 of The 5th William Holden Golden Boy Blogathon has arrived!!! I’m gonna be your host all day today!! Please keep in mind tomorrow the 16th Ginnie at The Wonderful World of Cinema will be taking over, with Michaela at Love Letters to Old Hollywood taking the reins on the 17th and final day, Bill’s 104th birthday!!! 

Referencing one of my favorite Golden Holden movies Paris when it Sizzles (1964), “I love that face“.

Need some background music?

Personally I can’t wait to read all of your wonderful entries about this brilliant actor, human, conservationist and Golden Boy!!! To honor Bill is a joy and a privilege and I’m thrilled to have been able to join these two wonderful ladies in celebrating him!!!

Today’s Entries!

Realweegiemidget kicks things off with explaining her thoughts on Mr. Holden in 1978’s Fedora.

Silver Screenings chats about Bill’s sweet performance in a sour film, Our Town (1940).

The Stop Button takes an in depth look at Apartment for Peggy (1948).

MovieRob looks to the TV side of things by telling us his take on the 1973 mini series The Blue Knight.

Satin and Shadows shows up to discuss Bill in Sunset Boulevard (1950) and why she fell for him!

Pop Culture Reverie stops by to remind us of another of Bill’s TV ventures with 21 Hours at Munich (1976).

Be sure to check out the entries of Day 2 and also Day 3!!!