Golden Boy Blogaton- Apartment For Peggy

Chemistry never looked more interesting!

WIth Ms Crain; they are so fabulous together!!!

This film is a rarity, but to me its a hidden gem- it’s so cute! and rarely on TV- so the next time it’s on TCM WATCH IT!!!!!!!!!!  Please!!!!!

As for you Mr Holden, as this, today , the date of this post, would have been your 99th birthday, I have this to say: You’re one of my favorite actors, and while not everyone may know who you are, to me you’ll always have a place in my heart, and in my life. Your movies are timeless, and I understand why the late Mr Robert Osborne considered you his favorite- like he said you spoke “always an honest word” when you were on screen. Happy Birthday, and as always, I bet you’re still good lookin’.

“I’m Mad As Hell and Not Gonna Take This Anymore”- Network 1976

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So a lot of you who do read my blog might know that I love William Holden- but what you may not know is how hesitant I initially was to watch Network. At first I said- “No Way”- I don’t wanna watch a movie where Bill is “Old”; I’m not a big fan of Faye Dunaway, and I’m not really into movies from the 70s because they are so different from the ones I do like from the 30s 40s and 50s.

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However- being in the film blogging community and following the TCMParty on twitter, I started to change my tune. I read a wonderful post that my friend Ginnie wrote up on her blog and I just started hearing these wonderful sentiments from, well everyone about the movie itself. So finally I cracked and said, “Well- William Holden is in this movie and it is iconic– I’ll just watch it for credit and the fact of being able to say- ‘Yes, I’ve seen that one.” ”

Getting to the part of me actually viewing the movie- When watching it- I had no idea of how amazing the plot, characters and iconic catchphrase of “I’m as Mad as Hell and I’m not gonna take this anymore” could be- I was so in awe of everything- and now I get it- I get it why Network is just such a fun movie to watch.

To me the only thing that dates Network is the technology  and the physical looks of the actors who are a part of the picture. Everything else is just as accurate today as it was back then. Especially for the “Mad as Hell statement”- I understand why Howard Beale (Peter Finch) isn’t gonna take it anymore- as who should?

Yes- his Mad as Hell spiel starts off as a statement to express why he’s mad at the station and his situation- but that’s not really the focus-  Beale then shifts his statement to why he’s just Mad! Mad as Hell! – and he shouldn’t have to put up with this- and as a matter of fact, either should you!

I think what makes this statement iconic is that no one had ever taken this risk of verbally expressing such strong feelings before in a film. I think maybe films such as Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and The Graduate (1967) were some of the first films to express angst or similar feeling in terms of actions, but it was all very symbolic and reading between the lines- whereas in this film the angst and anger, annoyance even in this statement is Bold and direct in terms of understanding.

Take a look at Howard Beale’s speech below

It just gets more and more accurate every time I watch it. And- the film in general gets funnier every time as well.

In short- I watched for Bill Holden , but I stayed for the funniness, accuracy, and overall just interesting and deeply layered plotline of the film.

 

For my own blogathon, I couldn’t think of any other way to wrap it up on! Be sure to check out other posts as they trickle in- and remember- sometimes It’s OK to be MAD AS HELL!!

THANKS SO MUCH EVERYONE FOR WRITING, READING AND PARTICIPATING!!!! See you round for the next one, soon I hope!!!

 

The Second Annual Classic Quotes Blogathon is Here!

Its arrived- the second annual classic quotes blogathon!

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Because this blogthon coincides with the TCMFF, I will be accepting posts all though next week, as there is not a silly school-like deadline to meet- this is “fun” learning!

I will be updating posts as they come in- so feel free to come back and look around to read about all the iconic and perfectly delivered quotes from some of your favorite films!

The Entries!

Charlene takes a break from Feuding by telling what Bette Davis actually said in All About Eve!

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Phyllis knows how  to decipher a Good Witch from a bad one in the Wizard of Oz.

Movies Silently Proves to us that you can quote (or kiss!) someone without saying a word.

Amanda tells us all about how The Man Who Shot liberty Valance properly prints a legend

Realweggiemidget tells us what inspired Jack Nicholson to “be a better man” in As Good as It Gets

Cary Grant Won’t Eat You tells us how being bad is better for Mae West in I’m No Angel. 

Le explains why the Maltese Falcon is “the stuff dreams are made of.”

Simoa calmly tells us why the Brewster family is practically insane in Arsenic and Old Lace. 

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The Midnite drive in tells us how Clint Eastwood makes their day

Catia gives us why Clark Gable had a right not to give a damn in Gone With the Wind. 

Kayla tells us about Claude Rains is shocked in Casablanca. 

Simoa tells us about why the moon is reaching for Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina.

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And I have my own post up- FINALLY!- But just don’t be “Mad as Hell” for mine being late! 🙂

 

The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)

So it may be the last day of Phyllis Loves Classic MoviesJohn Garfield blogathon, but I’ve still got a write up to do and articles to read! When Phyllis announced this Blogathon, I didn’t really know much about John Garfield, other than the fact he was in well, a movie star!!!

And it’s really bad but other than The Postman Always Rings Twice, the only other movie I’ve seen with him is Destination Tokyo with Cary Grant. I’m hoping to change this however, after reading all of your articles!!!

I chose to write about The Postman because it’s just a great movie- and the first time I saw it, I really didn’t think much of it- but then I re-watched it and thought, WOW- OK this is a really great movie! And now every time I see it, it just gets better and better. For me, like the title says, I had to give it two chances until I really took to it.

For those who haven’t seen The Postman Always Rings Twice, you probably already know the plot if you have seen any other film noir- It’s about two star crossed lovers, Cora (Lana Turner) and Frank (John Garfield) who can’t be together due to the fact that  Cora is married to a dull and boring older man, Nick. And yes, you’ve guessed it- upon seeing each other Cora and Frank fall madly in love and soon scheme together to murder Nick. I don’t even have to go on for you to guess the ending.

Although the plot of Postman may seem a bit cookie cutter, the film stands out due to the actors as both Lana and our rebel-with-a-cause John Garfield play their roles to absolute perfection. They light up the screen together and I think many of us wish they could have done another film together.

As much as Ms. Turner really is the star- John Garfield is just fabulous. I paid more attention to him this time around and I can definitely say I have a new appreciation for him.

Another thing I noticed this time around is the recurring element of “the second time’s a charm”. SPOILER: Two attempts to kill Nick, Two attempts at a romance, Two times Frank is under suspicion for murder, and in the end, two major deaths.

I also noticed that for Garfield, this was a real chance for him to shine as a “leading man” in a romantic way. For once he isn’t the action man, or the tough guy, in Postman he’s just a guy- no special trait or anything- a drifter, yet he’s still intriguing because he’s John Garfield.

So if anything else is to be gained in re-watching Postman its two things- never doubt the outcome of a second chance, and two- John Garfield is a cool guy.

We don’t judge you, Cora

If you can, pick up the blu-ray copy- as it has a full length documentary on John Garfield’s life and career narrated by his daughter Julie- it’s fascinating!!

PICTURE CREDIT- dvdbeaver

 

 

Sidney Poitier: 90th Birthday Blogathon

Oh! Canada Entry 2: Megan Follows

Niagara (1953)- Oh! Canada Blogathon

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For the Oh! Canada blogathon (hosted by Speak Easy and Silver Screenings), I decided to write about two “Canadian” related topics. The first is my love for the 1953 color film noir, Niagara and the second will be about my love for Canadian actress Megan Follows (AKA Anne Shirley!, it will be written written within the next few days!!).

But for my first entry, I couldn’t pass up the chance to write about one of my all time favorite film noirs, Niagara (1953) (Yes, you’ve guessed it! It takes place at the famous Canadian landmark! 😉 )starring Joseph Cotten and Marilyn Monroe in her break out role.

For those who may not recall, back in 2015, I wanted to view Niagara so badly, it turned out to be the film that made me get a blu ray player, as the DVD is out of print. I had been wanting to get a Blu-Ray player for some time, and Niagara was the film to push me to do it! It totally paid off too, as Niagara is  lush and just a visually stunning movie- and the beautiful Canadian backdrop is just to die for!

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Niagara for many is considered to be one of the two great “color noirs”, with Leave Her to Heaven (1945) being the other. In fact, this film was one of the last movies ever to use three strip Technicolor, which as we know, was unusual for film noirs. For many, Niagara is not be a hard boiled “traditional” noir with a PI/DI, a flashback, and the black and white shadowy cinematography, but it still lures you in like one of them. It still has a femme fatale, murder, betrayal, ill fated love, and jealousy – however, its all paced and scripted in a manner that doesn’t make you blurt out, “Film Noir!” I personally find it surprising this movie considered a great “film noir”, but for some reason, it works:

Image result for niagara 1953Marilyn Monroe plays the role of Rose Loomis, and her husband, George, is played by Joseph Cotten. At the start of the film, they are vacationing in Niagara Falls and soon they are joined by another couple, Polly and Ray Cutler (Jean Peters and Max Showalter). As with many noirs, Rose and George’s marriage is in trouble- and Rose has a secret lover. Polly then becomes caught up in the mess when the next day while touring the Falls, she sees Rose and her lover, Patrick- kissing.

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Jean Peters

As you can probably infer by now, Rose is planning to murder George and throw his body into the Falls with the song “Kiss” being played on the bells as the secret signal once to the job is done. It all goes wrong, however, when Patrick is the one who turns up dead, and not George. 

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Overall, I think Marilyn is just gorgeous in this film, and it proves her abilities as an actress, as she really isn’t a dumb blonde. She’s alluring and scheming- and yes- her murder plan may have gone wrong- but it takes a cunning individual to craft such a plan in the first place. The supporting roles are also played by a great cast- with Jean Peters being totally under-rated! And of course I can’t forget Mr. Joseph Cotten- as we get to see him in technicolor!!!

 

     

       Mr.  Joseph Cotten- Still handsome- and in COLOR!!! (DVDBEAVER- pic credit)

Overall, Niagara is just one of those great films from the 1950s- It’s dated in just the right places (fashion, in particular!) and like I mentioned earlier, it lures you into watching. I say its one of my favorite Marilyn performances and while it may not be on the “top tens” lists of 50’s films (or film noirs, etc)- its really a hidden gem that more people should watch!

 

 

 

 

 

In Name Only 1939 Carole Lombard Blogathon

Hello all you fabulous readers and fellow bloggers! I cant think of a better way to start of 2017 than with a blogathon honoring my favorite -and yours too- blonde from Indiana, Miss Carole Lombard! For me, Carole will always have a special place in my heart- for she was the most brave and outspoken dame out there! She’s inspiring and I am so glad she’s clearly loved by those who discover her today!

For this blogathon hosted by Phyllis Loves Classic Movies and In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood, I chose to write about one of Carole’s few dramatic turns in the 1939 classic In Name Only– which also stars Cary Grant, and co stars Kay Francis and Charles Coburn.

In Name Only is significant for a few reasons- first, its from 1939, second- it has a rare on- screen pairing of two legends- Lombard and Grant, and three- the role Carole was playing was one all too familiar to her- as she was playing the woman desperately in love with a married man , Alec (Grant), trying to divorce his awful wife (Kay Francis).

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In the end,  art imitates life (or is it the other way around?) and Carole and Cary’s characters do get together, just as Carole and Clark did in real life- a happy ending for both couples in both scenerios!

 

The Second Annual Classic Quotes Blogathon

Hello to all of you! As we wrap up 2016, I’d like to say I’ve been doing the “film blogging” thing for a little over a year now, and may I say it’s certainly the most wonderful hobby. I’ve learned so much from all of you and every blogathon I do is super fun!

As suggested by Silver Screenings  at the end of last year’s blogathon, I’ve decided to bring back my Classic Quote Blogathon! It will run from April 7- 9 2017. In this blogathon we are celebrating the classic sayings or phrases that have made it into our everyday lingo. From Clark Gable’s “Frankly, my dear I don’t give a damn” to Margaret Hamilton’s “I’ll get you my pretty; and you little dog too” these phrases have been parodied twice over and still remain as classic as the day they were said

Here are the rules for participating- This year I’m loosening the rules a bit!

  • Pick a quote from  a movie that has made its way into pop culture and since its release has went on to become relevant to everyday life.
  • If you’re not sure what to pick, head on over to the AFI top 100 quotes page. Unlike last year, YOUR QUOTE DOES NOT HAVE TO BE FROM THIS LIST. For even more inspiration here is the list of the 400 AFI nominated quotes YOU can come up with one not on any list, but just make sure it’s famous!!!
  • Here’s some suggestions of what to include in your post: 1- The speaker (actor and the character they portray) 2-The film it is from 3-Who the quote is directed to 4- anything significant surrounding the quote (i.e. maybe it almost got edited out, or maybe it was improvised by an actor or director) 5- the legacy it gives (why do we love this quote in the modern day when it was said by someone years and years ago?!) Don’t be afraid to throw in your own 2 cents and make it your own!
  • PLEASE, No duplicates, there’s many quotes out there! YOU MAY DO THE SAME MOVIE AS SOMEONE, JUST A DIFFERENT QUOTE!!!
  • Have fun!

Please submit your blog name and quotes in the comments section, DM me or tweet me on Twitter ( @flapperdame16 ), or you can email me at countessemily16@gmail.com.

THE ROSTER So Far:

The Flapper Dame- I’m as Mad as Hell, and I’m not gonna take this anymore!- Network (1976)

Back to the Golden Days– “Frankly My Dear, I don’t give a damn”- Gone with the Wind (1939)

The Lonely Critic-“Well Nobody’s Perfect” Some Like it Hot (1959)

Realweegiemidget- You make me want to be a better man.” – As Good as it Gets (1997)

The Wonderful World of Cinema-“Made it, Ma! Top of the world!”- White Heat (1949)

Movies Silently-“Kiss me, my fool” – A Fool There Was (1915)

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies– Are you a good witch or a bad witch?”- The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Midnite Drive In– “Go ahead make my day’ Dirty Harry

Criteria Retro– “The Stuff that Dreams are made of”- The Maltese Falcon (1941)

In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood- “Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain’t heard nothin’ yet!” –The Jazz Singer ( 1927 )

Champagne For Lunch– “The moon’s reaching for me.” Sabrina (1954) AND “Insanity runs in my family. It practically gallops.” Arsenic and Old Lace (1941)

Cary Grant Won’t Eat  You- When I’m good, I’m very good, but when I’m bad, I’m better. ” – I’m No Angel (1933)

Charlene’s (Mostly) Classic Movie Reviews – Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night”- All About Eve (1950)

Silver Screenings– Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth”- Pride of the Yankees

Peyron Classics -“Well, here’s another nice mess you’ve gotten me into.” – Oliver Hardy

Old Hollywood Films- Print the Legend” The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Here are some fabulous banners to use! AND HAVE FUN!!! 🙂

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Agnes Moorehead Blogathon: Magnificent Obsession (1954)

For my contribution for the Agnes Moorehead Blogathon, I signed up to write about one of the best melodramas from the 1950s, Magnificent Obsession.

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Although Agnes Moorehead plays a supporting role in this film as Jane Wyman’s friend/ nurse, Nancy, her role is an important one- for without her, Jane’s character Helen, would be totally lost and left to navigate on her own.

I have never seen a Douglas Sirk film before (or a Jane Wyman one, either) so I was very excited to do this blogathon! Personally, I was extremely keen to view this film in particular, as the creator of the Australian television show A Place To Call Home took heavy inspiration from this movie for the show. Looking back, I feel the creator did a superb job taking both cinematic elements and dramatic elements and incorporating them into his melodramatic 1950s period drama. (Seriously check it out! Its a great TV show! If you love the 1950s and period pieces- go watch it!!! Non spoiler description here)

For those who may be unfamiliar, the 1954 version of Magnificent Obsession is a remake (I myself have yet to see the 1935 original version with Irene Dunne), yet it is has surpassed the original in terms of popularity. Its theme and feel are very similar to that of An Affair to Remember (1957; which itself is a remake of 1939’s Love Affair). With lush technicolor scenes, dramatic plot twists, and plenty of romantic moments, Magnificent Obsession provides exactly what the name suggests.

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The story is kind of a crazy one, you see, Rock Hudson’s character, Bob, gets into a speedboat accident- and then has to be resuscitated, but in a turn of events, the Doctor, Dr. Phillips, who saved him- dies. The Doctor’s widow, Helen then is left on her own, while Bob who is hated by everyone for causing Dr. Phillip’s death. In an effort to get to know Helen better, Bob tries to befriend her, but she rejects his advances. But- in another turn of events, by rejecting Bob, Helen then is run over and blinded by a passing car. Bob, then commits his life to medicine to become a doctor and by doing so, falls in love with Helen.

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The lovely Miss Moorehead comes into play as Nancy Ashford, who is Helen’s friend and Nurse. Because Helen is blind, Nancy sort of acts as her eyes, doing simple things for Helen, such as writing letters, keeping her company ,and even being a travel companion.  I just thought Nancy was a wonderful friend- so patient and kind to Helen- the exact caretaker I would want in a bad situation.

The group of Hudson, Wyman, and Moorehead, and director Douglas Sirk was so successful that all of them reunited a year later to make All That Heaven Allows, with Hudson and Wyman again as love interests. (I have not yet seen it, so I’m not sure what role Moorehead plays).

In short, I can’t wait to add this movie to my collection once it becomes available on Blu-Ray (COME ON CRITERION!!!). Its just one of those feel good movies you can watch on a rainy (or snowy!) day. It transports you to another world and now, I wanna go out and buy these sunglasses!

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Source- The Criterion Collection

There’s certainly nothing quite like Magnificent Obsession– go out and watch it today!

*Available on DVD from the Criterion Collection